How to put the fun back into fundraising

Ruth Walker

28/03/2014
Categories: Wellbeing

Is your workplace suffering from fundraising fatigue? Times are tough and many people feel they have too much on their own plate to start worrying about other people. But that’s not to say we should all just give up on giving back. Doing things for other people not only gives us a warm fuzzy feeling inside, but it also encourages team spirit and helps out people in less fortunate circumstances.

What are the tell-tale signs of fundraising fatigue?

Fundraisers pester you on your lunch run, the thought of your colleague’s sponsored activity makes you feel exhausted and then there are the countless TV ads that seem to go on forever. All of which leaves you thinking ‘When did fundraising lose its fun?’, or something along those lines anyway.

If your events are lacking enthusiasm, there’s no better way to boost engagement then by mixing it up a little, that way more people will get involved and pull together as a team.

Choose your charity

Every year at Benefex we hold a vote to decide our chosen charity for the year, which is a great way to get everyone involved. Over recent years we have raised a whopping £7437.20 for various charities. This year we are fundraising on behalf of Naomi House, a fantastic facility in Winchester which offers care to young people with life limiting illnesses.

Get creative

Use your initiative and come up with a new idea to engage your workforce, you never know, you could come up with the next #nomakeupselfie. It’s best not to overcomplicate the concept; if you make it too complex people will lose interest. We’d suggest steering away from the tried and tested cake sales, how about taking the plunge and entering your chosen team in to the Tough Mudder challenge? It’s a hard core 10-12 mile obstacle race complete with tonnes of mud. Designed by the British Special Forces, it’s guaranteed to challenge the toughest of the tough.

You could also try the National Three Peaks Challenge which involves climbing the highest mountains in England, Scotland and Wales. There are no set rules for the challenge, with many people attempting to complete all three peaks in 24 hours, others opting for a more leisurely approach completing one mountain per day over a long weekend. However you plan to tackle the challenge, you will need to be fit, prepared and well organised.

Less fuss, more action

If that all sounds a bit too much then you can always organise an event for the office, food-related events always go down a treat as do dress down days.

We are currently hosting a ‘Chocolate for Charity’ appeal and encouraging our workforce to bring in bars, boxes and bags of chocolate to donate to Naomi House for their Easter tombola competition. In the past we have donned silly socks, donated toys and tried our luck at the notorious office raffle, all in the name of charity.

Timing is key

Companies may be wary of holding special events during working hours because of concerns that productivity may dip. But if managed pro-actively that doesn’t need to be the case. Obviously having a special event at work at your busiest time is just not practical.

It’s also worth noting that if you hold an event on or just after payday people are more likely to and participate. No-one likes being the person that has to tell the whole office they’re strapped for cash.

Thank you

It is very important that you remember to thank everyone who took part on the day, but also to let people know how much was raised. Remember it’s still business as usual but with an element of fun. The added bonus is that morale will take a significant boost too.

It doesn’t matter if your workplace is full of go getters, or if you take a more relaxed approach, there’s no reason why you can’t try something new in aid of charity.

And finally social media is your new best friend. Let the world know what a fun workplace you have and you’ll be surprised how many conversations it will lead to. We use Facebook to talk about what we’ve been up to, why not pop over and join the conversation.

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